GnuGO

GnuGO (UIQ 3.0)

Join the dots to defeat your opponent

Many a schoolday was wasted with endless games of Go (or 'Squares' as we called it) while the teacher wasn't looking. Anyone who enjoyed missing out on all that knowledge in the pursuit of fun can now play the game without fear of being caught, on their mobile phone thanks to GnuGO. View full description

PROS

  • Challenging computer opponent
  • Auto move-validation
  • Two player mode

CONS

  • The graphics are rubbish

Very good
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Many a schoolday was wasted with endless games of Go (or 'Squares' as we called it) while the teacher wasn't looking. Anyone who enjoyed missing out on all that knowledge in the pursuit of fun can now play the game without fear of being caught, on their mobile phone thanks to GnuGO.

As in its original format, your objective is to build the largest possible boxes in order to surround your opponent and 'capture' their squares. As always, you'll need sharp concentration skills and slight of hand in order to beat the highly adept computer opponent, which actually learns as the game goes on. In your favour though is an automatic helper that validates your moves. There's also a two player mode if you're fed up losing to the phone and want to inflict some of this misery onto a pal.

Although the graphics in GnuGO are pretty feable, the game is highly addictive and the challenge of defeating the skilled computer opponent will keep you coming back for more.

GnuGO is a free software program by the Free Software Foundation that allows you to play Go on your phone. Go is a strategic board game for two players. It is known as Weiqi in Chinese, Igo or Go in Japanese, and Baduk or Padu, sometimes Gi in Korean.

Go originated in ancient China, centuries before its earliest known references in 5th century BC writing. It is mostly popular in East Asia, but has nowadays gained some popularity in the rest of the world as well. Go is noted for being rich in strategic complexity despite its simple rules.

Go is played by two players alternately placing black and white stones on the vacant intersections of a line grid. The standard size of this grid is 19 × 19, although the rules of Go can be freely applied to any size: 13 × 13 and 9 × 9 are also popular choices for more simple and tactic-oriented games as well as a way to introduce Go to new players.

The objective is to control a larger part of a board than the opponent as a result of having placed one's stones such that they form territories that cannot be captured by the opponent.

Source: Wikipedia

GnuGO

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GnuGO (UIQ 3.0)